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Ondine, ou la Naïade et le Pêcheur



Suite from the ballet
Music by Cesare Pugni
Libretto by William Grieve and Jules-Joseph Perrot in Yury Burlaka’s version
World premiere: June 22, 1843, London
Choreography by Alexander Shiryaev,
Staging and new revised choreography by Yury Burlaka
Choreography by Yury Burlaka
Stage conductorAndrey Danilov
Set Designer – Andrey Voitenko
Costume Designer – Tatiana Noginova
Lighting Designer – Alexander Naumov

In 1843, a production named «Ondine, ou La naïade» of ballet-master Jules Perrot to the music of Cesare Pugni appeared on the stage of the Royal Theater in London for the first time. This collaboration between the outstanding choreographer and the Genoese ballet composer has given the world more than 30 romantic ballets. The plot of «Ondine» is based on the fabulous story of the love of an inhabitant of the sea kingdom Naiada to a man – a simple fisherman Matteo, who resists her charms, because he has a bride Giannina.

In 1851, both ballet creators met in St. Petersburg and, with the supreme permission, began to transfer their European productions to the Imperial Stage. As a result, Perrot stayed in Russia for 8 years and left it with his wife already found here and two children from a joint marriage, and Puni stayed in Russia until the end of his days and created 35 ballets for the Mariinsky Theater.

The Russian premiere of «Ondine» took place in 1851 under the title «Ondine, ou la Naïade et le Pêcheur». In 1892, Marius Petipa staged his own version of this ballet – the libretto remains the same, but the dances become different. In 1903, the choreography changed again: this time it was created by his assistant the grandson of Cesare Pugni, Alexander Shiryaev, reproducing the pantomimes by Petipa. After the resumption of Shiryaev's version in 1921, this romantic ballet left the theater repertoire for many years. And only in 1981, choreographer and teacher Pyotr Gusev, who saw Shiryaev's staging, restores from memory the suite from this ballet and presents it on the stage of the Leningrad MALEGOT (now the Mikhailovsky Theater). Out of the original six scenes of the three-act ballet, replete with pantomime scenes and sophisticated stage effects, Gusev restored only a dance suite with a highly modified plot.

This rare ballet also comes to Samara as a suite, consisting of three scenes. Choreographer Yuri Burlaka created his own version of the original libretto by William Grieve and Jules Perrot and choreography by Alexander Shiryaev. Also the new musical drama belongs to his authorship. In this production, the stage machinery, which was admired by the audience of the 19th century, will begin to return to the stage for the first time.
 
Synopsis

1. The first meeting of Naiad and Fisherman
Peasants and fishermen are the residents of an Italian village on the seashore. They are preparing for the feast in honor of the Mother of God. They are joined by Matteo and Giannina, his fiancee. A young fisherman invites friends to his wedding, which takes place the next day.
Everyone disperses, Giannina goes to his hut, and Matteo, left alone, wants to throw the fishing net into the sea; and then a large shell emerges from its depths. For the first time, Matteo sees the living Naiad, who until then had often appeared to him in his dreams. The young man remains indifferent to the temptations offered to him by Undine in order to make him forget his beloved. He turns away and wants to go to Giannina's hut, but Undine fascinates the young Fisherman. In vain he tries to overcome the supernatural power of this enchantment, he is already bewitched: step by step Matteo follows the elusive Undine. He tries to catch her with his fishing net. Naiad, accepting the game, allows herself to be entangled. Delighted, Matteo is ready to rush after her, but he is saved by the unexpected appearance of the peasants. The presence of humans temporarily invalidates Undine her witchcraft. Matteo drops down to his knees and offers a prayer of thanks.

2. Country festival
(Grand pas scénique)

Fishermen and Fisherwomen appear, taking part in a cheerful village holiday. Matteo and Giannina are at the center of common joy. But suddenly Naiad appears, visible only to Matteo. He would like to follow her, but he cannot leave his bride either. Naiad flashing here and there during the dance constantly attracts the attention of the Fisherman. Giannina puzzles of Matteo’s outlandish behavior, she understands nothing. This scene ends with a joyful dance, during which the unseen Naiad, immersed in sadness, watches the reunion of Matteo and Giannina.

3. Dance of Naiad with a shadow
Naiad, tormented by her love for a mortal, in despair turns to her native element with a request to grant her the appearance and fate of a mortal so that she could unite with her beloved Matteo.
Suddenly, new sensations overwhelm her. The moon comes out and Undine sees her shadow for the first time. At the beginning, she cannot fully understand what happened to her, takes her shadow for a rival and tries vainly to drive it away. And then, realizing the change that has taken place, he happily indulges in dance, playing and having fun with the shadow as with a new friend.

4. Great Forlana and the Final
At this time, young men and women appear on the stage, gathering for the feast of the protectress of the land. A fun dance begins. At this time, to the amusement of everybody, a young peasant woman appears, who is trying to find Matteo in the crowd. This peasant woman is Undine; she took on a human form to engage Matteo's heart. Two young fishermen want to possess an elegant coral basket, what she is holding. Undine announces that she will give the basket to the fisherman who is capable of love more than others. Then she puts her hand to the hearts of all the young fishermen; going up to Matteo, she in embarrassment tells that the basket belongs to him, and with tenderness and coquetry she tries to awaken in Matteo's heart love for her. But the shocked Giannina again captures Matteo's attention and draws him into the continuing dances.
The fiery tarantella is interrupted by the ringing of bells announcing the time of evening prayer. Everyone kneels. However, the religious character of the music gradually turns into a more lively one, suggestive the overflow of water. Undine appears from the water. Matteo looks narrowly every step and every movement of Undine. The cunning Naiad, convinced of her victory, dives into her native element, and then appears on the top of the cliff.
 
Naiad (Undine)
Matteo (Fisherman)
Giannina (Matteo's fiancee)
Antonio (Fisherman, friend of Matteo)
Giuseppe (Fisherman, friend of Matteo)
Teresa (Antonio's fiancee)
Lucia (Giuseppe’s fiancee)
Fisherwomen
 
Genre: Ballet
Original name: Ondine, ou la Naïade et le Pêcheur
Title: Ondine, ou la Naïade et le Pêcheur
Number of actions: 1
Premiere date: 20 december 2019
Age: 12+


Suite from the ballet
Music by Cesare Pugni
Libretto by William Grieve and Jules-Joseph Perrot in Yury Burlaka’s version
World premiere: June 22, 1843, London
Choreography by Alexander Shiryaev,
Staging and new revised choreography by Yury Burlaka
Choreography by Yury Burlaka
Stage conductorAndrey Danilov
Set Designer – Andrey Voitenko
Costume Designer – Tatiana Noginova
Lighting Designer – Alexander Naumov

In 1843, a production named «Ondine, ou La naïade» of ballet-master Jules Perrot to the music of Cesare Pugni appeared on the stage of the Royal Theater in London for the first time. This collaboration between the outstanding choreographer and the Genoese ballet composer has given the world more than 30 romantic ballets. The plot of «Ondine» is based on the fabulous story of the love of an inhabitant of the sea kingdom Naiada to a man – a simple fisherman Matteo, who resists her charms, because he has a bride Giannina.

In 1851, both ballet creators met in St. Petersburg and, with the supreme permission, began to transfer their European productions to the Imperial Stage. As a result, Perrot stayed in Russia for 8 years and left it with his wife already found here and two children from a joint marriage, and Puni stayed in Russia until the end of his days and created 35 ballets for the Mariinsky Theater.

The Russian premiere of «Ondine» took place in 1851 under the title «Ondine, ou la Naïade et le Pêcheur». In 1892, Marius Petipa staged his own version of this ballet – the libretto remains the same, but the dances become different. In 1903, the choreography changed again: this time it was created by his assistant the grandson of Cesare Pugni, Alexander Shiryaev, reproducing the pantomimes by Petipa. After the resumption of Shiryaev's version in 1921, this romantic ballet left the theater repertoire for many years. And only in 1981, choreographer and teacher Pyotr Gusev, who saw Shiryaev's staging, restores from memory the suite from this ballet and presents it on the stage of the Leningrad MALEGOT (now the Mikhailovsky Theater). Out of the original six scenes of the three-act ballet, replete with pantomime scenes and sophisticated stage effects, Gusev restored only a dance suite with a highly modified plot.

This rare ballet also comes to Samara as a suite, consisting of three scenes. Choreographer Yuri Burlaka created his own version of the original libretto by William Grieve and Jules Perrot and choreography by Alexander Shiryaev. Also the new musical drama belongs to his authorship. In this production, the stage machinery, which was admired by the audience of the 19th century, will begin to return to the stage for the first time.
 
Synopsis

1. The first meeting of Naiad and Fisherman
Peasants and fishermen are the residents of an Italian village on the seashore. They are preparing for the feast in honor of the Mother of God. They are joined by Matteo and Giannina, his fiancee. A young fisherman invites friends to his wedding, which takes place the next day.
Everyone disperses, Giannina goes to his hut, and Matteo, left alone, wants to throw the fishing net into the sea; and then a large shell emerges from its depths. For the first time, Matteo sees the living Naiad, who until then had often appeared to him in his dreams. The young man remains indifferent to the temptations offered to him by Undine in order to make him forget his beloved. He turns away and wants to go to Giannina's hut, but Undine fascinates the young Fisherman. In vain he tries to overcome the supernatural power of this enchantment, he is already bewitched: step by step Matteo follows the elusive Undine. He tries to catch her with his fishing net. Naiad, accepting the game, allows herself to be entangled. Delighted, Matteo is ready to rush after her, but he is saved by the unexpected appearance of the peasants. The presence of humans temporarily invalidates Undine her witchcraft. Matteo drops down to his knees and offers a prayer of thanks.

2. Country festival
(Grand pas scénique)

Fishermen and Fisherwomen appear, taking part in a cheerful village holiday. Matteo and Giannina are at the center of common joy. But suddenly Naiad appears, visible only to Matteo. He would like to follow her, but he cannot leave his bride either. Naiad flashing here and there during the dance constantly attracts the attention of the Fisherman. Giannina puzzles of Matteo’s outlandish behavior, she understands nothing. This scene ends with a joyful dance, during which the unseen Naiad, immersed in sadness, watches the reunion of Matteo and Giannina.

3. Dance of Naiad with a shadow
Naiad, tormented by her love for a mortal, in despair turns to her native element with a request to grant her the appearance and fate of a mortal so that she could unite with her beloved Matteo.
Suddenly, new sensations overwhelm her. The moon comes out and Undine sees her shadow for the first time. At the beginning, she cannot fully understand what happened to her, takes her shadow for a rival and tries vainly to drive it away. And then, realizing the change that has taken place, he happily indulges in dance, playing and having fun with the shadow as with a new friend.

4. Great Forlana and the Final
At this time, young men and women appear on the stage, gathering for the feast of the protectress of the land. A fun dance begins. At this time, to the amusement of everybody, a young peasant woman appears, who is trying to find Matteo in the crowd. This peasant woman is Undine; she took on a human form to engage Matteo's heart. Two young fishermen want to possess an elegant coral basket, what she is holding. Undine announces that she will give the basket to the fisherman who is capable of love more than others. Then she puts her hand to the hearts of all the young fishermen; going up to Matteo, she in embarrassment tells that the basket belongs to him, and with tenderness and coquetry she tries to awaken in Matteo's heart love for her. But the shocked Giannina again captures Matteo's attention and draws him into the continuing dances.
The fiery tarantella is interrupted by the ringing of bells announcing the time of evening prayer. Everyone kneels. However, the religious character of the music gradually turns into a more lively one, suggestive the overflow of water. Undine appears from the water. Matteo looks narrowly every step and every movement of Undine. The cunning Naiad, convinced of her victory, dives into her native element, and then appears on the top of the cliff.
 
Naiad (Undine)
Matteo (Fisherman)
Giannina (Matteo's fiancee)
Antonio (Fisherman, friend of Matteo)
Giuseppe (Fisherman, friend of Matteo)
Teresa (Antonio's fiancee)
Lucia (Giuseppe’s fiancee)
Fisherwomen
 



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