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Carmina Burana



 Conductor, Chorus Master – Maxim Pozhidaev, Chief Chorus Master of the Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre
Stage Director – Marina Shapkina
Stage Designer – Elena Solovyova, Chief Artist of Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre
Lighting Designer – Emil Avramenko
Video content – Vladimir Porotkin
The musical director of the production – Evgeny Khokhlov, the Artistic Director and Chief Conductor of the Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre

The scenic cantata “Carmina Burana” is well-known to everyone: the epic power and mysterious Latin text of the opening chorus “O Fortuna” has fascinated the film industry, rock musicians, and TV program creators for many years.
Translated from Latin "Carmina Burana" means "Boyner's songs." It was in the Boyern Benedictine monastery, which has existed since the VIII century, in 1803 the manuscript was discovered, which received this name. This is a collection of more than 250 poems created in the period XI-XIII centuries. Most of them are written in Latin – the language of international communication of the clergy and educated people of that era, but there are texts in medieval German and French. Almost all of them are far from religious subjects and mainly talk about the joys and sorrows of earthly life, in which there is a place for physical love, and booze, and gambling.
In 1934, the publication of selected fragments of “Carmina Burana” fell into the hands of composer Karl Orff, a researcher of ancient European music and a connoisseur of Latin poetry. Together with the Latinist Michel Hoffmann (1903-1968), Orff selected 23 poems and built them in a closed cycle dedicated to the most powerful and mysterious force that governs human life – the power of fate.
The resulting structure consists of five sections: “In the Spring”, “In the Tavern”, “Court of Love” and “Fortune, Empress of the World” repeating at the beginning and end. Each of them literally or metaphorically shows how the wheel of fortune rotates, turning joy into grief, and hope into despair – and vice versa.
In 1937, the Frankfurt Opera House premiered the first production of the scenic cantata "Carmina Burana" for soloists, three choirs and a large orchestra. It was a large-scale theatrical performance with costumes, stage sceneries, scenic movement and dancing – this is exactly what Karl Orff wanted to see his brainchild, his whole life thinking in terms of theater.
In 1956, Orff's student Wilhelm Killmayer (1927-2017) arranged the Carmina Burana for soloists, two choirs, two grand pianos and percussion instruments. Orff approved and confirmed this version. It sounds on the Small Stage of the Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre
The production is attended by soloists and the choir of the Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theater, students of the children's choral school.


Genre: Scenic cantata
Language: Latin, Middle High German (with Russian supertitles)
Original name: Carmina Burana: Cantiones profanae cantoribus et choris cantandae comitantibus instrumentis atque imaginibus magicis
Title: Carmina Burana
Duration: 1 час 10 мин
Number of actions: 1
Premiere date: 27 february 2020
Age: 12+


 Conductor, Chorus Master – Maxim Pozhidaev, Chief Chorus Master of the Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre
Stage Director – Marina Shapkina
Stage Designer – Elena Solovyova, Chief Artist of Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre
Lighting Designer – Emil Avramenko
Video content – Vladimir Porotkin
The musical director of the production – Evgeny Khokhlov, the Artistic Director and Chief Conductor of the Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre

The scenic cantata “Carmina Burana” is well-known to everyone: the epic power and mysterious Latin text of the opening chorus “O Fortuna” has fascinated the film industry, rock musicians, and TV program creators for many years.
Translated from Latin "Carmina Burana" means "Boyner's songs." It was in the Boyern Benedictine monastery, which has existed since the VIII century, in 1803 the manuscript was discovered, which received this name. This is a collection of more than 250 poems created in the period XI-XIII centuries. Most of them are written in Latin – the language of international communication of the clergy and educated people of that era, but there are texts in medieval German and French. Almost all of them are far from religious subjects and mainly talk about the joys and sorrows of earthly life, in which there is a place for physical love, and booze, and gambling.
In 1934, the publication of selected fragments of “Carmina Burana” fell into the hands of composer Karl Orff, a researcher of ancient European music and a connoisseur of Latin poetry. Together with the Latinist Michel Hoffmann (1903-1968), Orff selected 23 poems and built them in a closed cycle dedicated to the most powerful and mysterious force that governs human life – the power of fate.
The resulting structure consists of five sections: “In the Spring”, “In the Tavern”, “Court of Love” and “Fortune, Empress of the World” repeating at the beginning and end. Each of them literally or metaphorically shows how the wheel of fortune rotates, turning joy into grief, and hope into despair – and vice versa.
In 1937, the Frankfurt Opera House premiered the first production of the scenic cantata "Carmina Burana" for soloists, three choirs and a large orchestra. It was a large-scale theatrical performance with costumes, stage sceneries, scenic movement and dancing – this is exactly what Karl Orff wanted to see his brainchild, his whole life thinking in terms of theater.
In 1956, Orff's student Wilhelm Killmayer (1927-2017) arranged the Carmina Burana for soloists, two choirs, two grand pianos and percussion instruments. Orff approved and confirmed this version. It sounds on the Small Stage of the Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre
The production is attended by soloists and the choir of the Samara Academic Opera and Ballet Theater, students of the children's choral school.





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