Close search

The Love for Three Oranges



The Love for Three Oranges, Op. 33, also known by its French language title L'amour des trois oranges (Russian: Любовь к трём апельсинам, Lyubov' k tryom apel'sinam), is a satirical opera by Sergei Prokofiev. Its French libretto was based on. The opera premiered at the Auditorium Theatre in Chicago, Illinois, on 30 December 1921.

Music by Sergei Prokofiev. Libretto by the composer after the Italian play L'amore delle tre melarance (1761) by Carlo Gozzi.

Stage director – Natalia Dychenko
Musical director – Evgeny Khokhlov
Set designer – Elena Solovyova
Costume designer – Natalia Zemalindinova
Lighting designer – Evgeny Ganzburg
Video FX – Vladimir Porotkin
Chorus master – Olga Safronova
Choreographer – Pavel Samokhvalov

Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953) composed his first opera when he was but a nine-year-old boy. A short fairy-tale titled The Giant showed all the features of the composer in a nutshell: a self-sufficing librettist, apt in stage conventions and keen on sophisticated plot twists.
Prokofiev’s operatic legacy comprises of eight pieces: from a one-act Maddalena (1913) to an epic, two-evenings-long War and Peace (1943) to a mystical Fiery Angel (1928) to a propagandistic The Story of a Real Man (1948). Two of them a comic: Betrothal in a Monastery (1946) and The Love for Three Oranges (1921).
The first to conceive an opera about a strange passion for fruits was the legendary Russian director Vsevolod Meyerhold (1874-1940) whose theatre magazine published in Petrograd (St Petersburg) in 1914-1916 was titled The Love for Three Oranges. The magazine’s pilot issue featured an eponimous play by Meyerhold, director Vladimir Solovyev and poet Konstantin Vogak after a comic fairy-tale by an Italian playwright Carlo Gozzi (1720-1806), author of the famous Turandot. Meyerhold supplied Prokofiev with a copy, expecting him to compose an opera.
And Prokofiev did compose the opera, and wrote his own libretto based on the play, but Meyerhold was not to stage it: it was commissioned by the Auditorium Theatre in Chicago, U.S. The score was finished in October 1919, and the first performance took place in December 1921 to great acclaim. In the U.S. it went under the title of L'amour des trois oranges, its libretto being translated into French.
The year 1926 saw the first Russian production of the opera. It was put on at the Leningrad Opera and Ballet Theatre (now Mariinsky Theatre) by Meyerhold’s follower Sergey Radlov (1892-1956), and Nikolay Foregger (1892-1939), who later, in 1838-39, was the artistic director of the Samara (then Kuybyshev) Opera House. But the first Samara/ Kuybyshev production of The Love for Three Oranges is this one, put up 100 years after the opera was written.
 
Roles:
King of Clubs
The Prince, his son
Princess Clarice, the King's niece
Leandro, the prime minister
Truffaldino, the jester
Pantalone, the King's advisor
Tchelio, a magician
Fata Morgana
Princess Ninette
Princess Linette
Princess Nicolette
Smeraldina
Farfarello
Cook
Master of Ceremonies
Courtiers, Physicians, Ridicules, Trumpeters, Little Demons

Prologue
Which play to stage? A tragedy, a comedy, a farce? That’s the question for the fairy kingdom! And the answer is… The Love for the Three Oranges!

Act One
The King of Clubs is grieving: his heir the Prince is in deep hypochondriac depression. The Physicians have no means to cure him. The King realizes that laughter is the best therapist. Pantalone, the King's advisor, summons Truffaldino, the jester, and the latter is ordered to organize a feast – one that will make the Prince rejoice.
Meanwhile Tchelio, a magician who wants to restore the good in the world, plays with Fata Morgana, whose goals are quite the opposite. The future of the kingdom is at stake. Tchelio loses the game.
Leandro, the prime minister, favoured by Fata Morgana, conspires with Princess Clarice, the King's niece. Their plot is to bring the Prince to complete ruin, so that Clarice would inherit the throne. Smeraldina, the maid, joins the conspiracy.
Truffaldino brings the Prince to the feast, but the Prince cannot be amused. Suddenly Fata Morgana appears uninvited. Truffaldino tries to drive her away, and this does make the Prince laugh! Infuriated Fata Morgana hexes the Prince: he should fall in love with the three oranges kept at the wicked witch Creonta’s by the intimidating Cook. The Prince sets off right away to find the objects of his desire, taking Truffaldino with him.

Act Two
On their way to Creonta’s the Prince and Truffaldino meet Tchelio who instructs them and gives them a magic ribbon that will disarm the Cook. With Tchelio’s help the two adventurers reach their destination. While Truffaldino uses the ribbon to distract the Cook, the Prince steals the three oranges.
Too tired to continue, the Prince falls asleep on the way back. Truffaldino is thirsty, so he opens two of the oranges. Instead of juice, the fruits release two enchanted princesses, Linetta and Nicoletta. Seeing them die of thirst, Truffaldino runs away. The Prince wakes up and opens up the third orange – to release Princess Ninetta. This is love at first sight, and Ninetta survives.
The Prince hurries to the palace to fetch a robe for Ninetta. Fata Morgana send Smeraldina to conjure Ninetta into a monstrous rat and to usurp her place as the Prince’s bride. The Prince returns with the King and the courtiers, only to find he’s been cheated. However, Smeraldina manages to convince the King that the Prince has promised to marry her.
Meanwhile, Tchelio turns the tables on Fata Morgana, and when the bewitched Ninetta appears at the Prince’s wedding, Tchelio breaks her spell. The three conspirators are exposed and sentenced to death, but Fata Morgana saves them.
Long live the King, the Prince and the Princess!
 
Title: The Love for Three Oranges
Premiere date: 13 september 2019
Age: 12+


The Love for Three Oranges, Op. 33, also known by its French language title L'amour des trois oranges (Russian: Любовь к трём апельсинам, Lyubov' k tryom apel'sinam), is a satirical opera by Sergei Prokofiev. Its French libretto was based on. The opera premiered at the Auditorium Theatre in Chicago, Illinois, on 30 December 1921.

Music by Sergei Prokofiev. Libretto by the composer after the Italian play L'amore delle tre melarance (1761) by Carlo Gozzi.

Stage director – Natalia Dychenko
Musical director – Evgeny Khokhlov
Set designer – Elena Solovyova
Costume designer – Natalia Zemalindinova
Lighting designer – Evgeny Ganzburg
Video FX – Vladimir Porotkin
Chorus master – Olga Safronova
Choreographer – Pavel Samokhvalov

Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953) composed his first opera when he was but a nine-year-old boy. A short fairy-tale titled The Giant showed all the features of the composer in a nutshell: a self-sufficing librettist, apt in stage conventions and keen on sophisticated plot twists.
Prokofiev’s operatic legacy comprises of eight pieces: from a one-act Maddalena (1913) to an epic, two-evenings-long War and Peace (1943) to a mystical Fiery Angel (1928) to a propagandistic The Story of a Real Man (1948). Two of them a comic: Betrothal in a Monastery (1946) and The Love for Three Oranges (1921).
The first to conceive an opera about a strange passion for fruits was the legendary Russian director Vsevolod Meyerhold (1874-1940) whose theatre magazine published in Petrograd (St Petersburg) in 1914-1916 was titled The Love for Three Oranges. The magazine’s pilot issue featured an eponimous play by Meyerhold, director Vladimir Solovyev and poet Konstantin Vogak after a comic fairy-tale by an Italian playwright Carlo Gozzi (1720-1806), author of the famous Turandot. Meyerhold supplied Prokofiev with a copy, expecting him to compose an opera.
And Prokofiev did compose the opera, and wrote his own libretto based on the play, but Meyerhold was not to stage it: it was commissioned by the Auditorium Theatre in Chicago, U.S. The score was finished in October 1919, and the first performance took place in December 1921 to great acclaim. In the U.S. it went under the title of L'amour des trois oranges, its libretto being translated into French.
The year 1926 saw the first Russian production of the opera. It was put on at the Leningrad Opera and Ballet Theatre (now Mariinsky Theatre) by Meyerhold’s follower Sergey Radlov (1892-1956), and Nikolay Foregger (1892-1939), who later, in 1838-39, was the artistic director of the Samara (then Kuybyshev) Opera House. But the first Samara/ Kuybyshev production of The Love for Three Oranges is this one, put up 100 years after the opera was written.
 
Roles:
King of Clubs
The Prince, his son
Princess Clarice, the King's niece
Leandro, the prime minister
Truffaldino, the jester
Pantalone, the King's advisor
Tchelio, a magician
Fata Morgana
Princess Ninette
Princess Linette
Princess Nicolette
Smeraldina
Farfarello
Cook
Master of Ceremonies
Courtiers, Physicians, Ridicules, Trumpeters, Little Demons

Prologue
Which play to stage? A tragedy, a comedy, a farce? That’s the question for the fairy kingdom! And the answer is… The Love for the Three Oranges!

Act One
The King of Clubs is grieving: his heir the Prince is in deep hypochondriac depression. The Physicians have no means to cure him. The King realizes that laughter is the best therapist. Pantalone, the King's advisor, summons Truffaldino, the jester, and the latter is ordered to organize a feast – one that will make the Prince rejoice.
Meanwhile Tchelio, a magician who wants to restore the good in the world, plays with Fata Morgana, whose goals are quite the opposite. The future of the kingdom is at stake. Tchelio loses the game.
Leandro, the prime minister, favoured by Fata Morgana, conspires with Princess Clarice, the King's niece. Their plot is to bring the Prince to complete ruin, so that Clarice would inherit the throne. Smeraldina, the maid, joins the conspiracy.
Truffaldino brings the Prince to the feast, but the Prince cannot be amused. Suddenly Fata Morgana appears uninvited. Truffaldino tries to drive her away, and this does make the Prince laugh! Infuriated Fata Morgana hexes the Prince: he should fall in love with the three oranges kept at the wicked witch Creonta’s by the intimidating Cook. The Prince sets off right away to find the objects of his desire, taking Truffaldino with him.

Act Two
On their way to Creonta’s the Prince and Truffaldino meet Tchelio who instructs them and gives them a magic ribbon that will disarm the Cook. With Tchelio’s help the two adventurers reach their destination. While Truffaldino uses the ribbon to distract the Cook, the Prince steals the three oranges.
Too tired to continue, the Prince falls asleep on the way back. Truffaldino is thirsty, so he opens two of the oranges. Instead of juice, the fruits release two enchanted princesses, Linetta and Nicoletta. Seeing them die of thirst, Truffaldino runs away. The Prince wakes up and opens up the third orange – to release Princess Ninetta. This is love at first sight, and Ninetta survives.
The Prince hurries to the palace to fetch a robe for Ninetta. Fata Morgana send Smeraldina to conjure Ninetta into a monstrous rat and to usurp her place as the Prince’s bride. The Prince returns with the King and the courtiers, only to find he’s been cheated. However, Smeraldina manages to convince the King that the Prince has promised to marry her.
Meanwhile, Tchelio turns the tables on Fata Morgana, and when the bewitched Ninetta appears at the Prince’s wedding, Tchelio breaks her spell. The three conspirators are exposed and sentenced to death, but Fata Morgana saves them.
Long live the King, the Prince and the Princess!
 



powered by CACKLE
Partners
Write to us